TOSKOVIC Company® - Active advertisments for the job in Scandinavian countries!
«TOSKOVIC Company®»
«TD Company®»
«TOSKOVIC Investments Funds» 
«TOSKOVIC Real Estate Business Investments & Consulting Company» 
«TOSKOVIC ESPAÑA» 
«TOSKOVIC EXPORT-IMPORT» 
www.toskovicrealestate.com 
 
Our Company Demand:
 
Required business associates and co-workers in the whole of Scandinavia!
If you are communicative and have a business acquaintance, be our agent and representative in Scandinavia!
 
For all details contact Us or leave your contact information!
Send CV to: toskovicrealestate@gmail.com  - if you are interested. 
 
TOSKOVIC Company®
e-mail: toskovicrealestate@gmail.com
website: www.toskovicrealestate.com
Exports to Scandinavia!
Business culture varies greatly throughout Scandinavia. From consensus-oriented Sweden in a more direct and to the point way of doing business in Finland. To make the most of the opportunities offered by highly educated, often in several languages, an early adopter of the region totaling nearly 20 million consumers contact Us (TOSKOVIC Company®) today.
Exports to Scandinavia!
Scandinavia is a large region of northern Europe, which is mainly composed of the Scandinavian Peninsula. As such, it includes the countries of Norway and Sweden. Furthermore, Denmark, Finland and Iceland are also included in Scandinavia. Geographically, the Scandinavian Peninsula is the largest peninsula in Europe, and stretches from above the Arctic Circle, at 66.5 ° N latitude north-south and the Baltic Sea.
-- Denmark
Denmark is a constitutional monarchy which shares a southern border with Germany and is connected by bridge to southern Sweden.  The country has been a member of the European Union (EU) since 1973. Denmark is a rich, modern society with state-of-the-art infrastructure and distribution systems, a highly skilled labor force and a central location that makes it an excellent distribution point for the Scandinavian, Northern European and Baltic markets. The economy displays a number of strengths. The flexicurity system helps adjust to shocks while limiting the social cost of unemployment and the risk that it could become entrenched. The social welfare system ensures low poverty and low inequality. Denmark’s fiscal position is relatively sound. Though it has deteriorated during the current economic crisis, Denmark entered the crisis in a strong position and the budget deficit has remained moderate both compared to Denmark’s past experience and to other OECD countries.  However, competitiveness has deteriorated in the past decade and productivity growth has been weak, eroding potential growth. Moreover, vulnerabilities remain in the financial sector.  Denmark’s standard of living is among the highest in the world with a GDP per capita of USD 59,889 in 2011 (Source: World Bank).  Denmark is a firm advocate of liberal trade and investment policies and actively 
encourages foreign investment.  International political and commercial relations are excellent. The United States is Denmark's largest trading partner outside the EU, with a 9% share of total Danish trade in goods. 
Denmark’s major imports are: industrial machinery, capital equipment, computers and telecom products, software, aircraft, and scientific instruments. Other important trade items to Denmark are military equipment, chemicals and pharmaceuticals, tobacco, wine, fresh vegetables, nuts, and forest products. Imports of goods and services in Denmark, % of GDP (45.1%).

Market Opportunities
The import climate is open and receptive to international products and investments. There are no significant trade barriers or regulations that most countries need to take into consideration. Danish imports are very diversified and many opportunities are available. The most promising sectors for market growth for non-agricultural companies in the coming year include: IT and telecommunication equipment and services, biotech and pharmaceutical products, tourism services, financial services, renewable energy systems, offshore oil and gas field equipment, consumer goods and advanced medical equipment. The most promising agricultural export prospects are wine, forest products, feed (including pet food), fresh vegetables, and processed foods. International companies are expected to maintain and expand their market share in the coming years. In high-technology areas such as information technology and medical equipment, U.S. companies are already market leaders and are expected to increase their lead. Denmark is an industrialized “value-added” country, dependent on foreign supplies of most raw materials and semi-manufactured goods. However, it is a net exporter of oil, and has more than one-third of the world’s wind technology turbine sales. 
-- Finland
Through an alignment of geopolitical, geophysical and economic factors we see the rise of the “New North,” where the impacts of climate change, a unique combination of sea, air and rail transport plus growing prosperity in Russia and Asia have presented a set of unrivaled new business opportunities. In many ways, Finland is the epicenter of this “New North” – a unique intersection of geography, infrastructure, education, good governance and business spirit. Finland, an EU member since 1995, has redefined itself from a quiet agricultural based economy to a trend setting, global center for technology. Its commercial clout is far in 
excess of its modest 5.4 million population. Finland routinely ranks at the very top in international surveys of research and development funding competitiveness, 
transparency, literacy, and education. Helsinki, a modest-sized green maritime metropolis, is a mere 3.5 hours from St. Petersburg via high speed train. In Finland, nature reigns supreme and it is no surprise that Helsinki was the site of the first LEED certified building in the Nordics. Finland, along with all its Nordic neighbors, have a focused interest in high-performance buildings that are energy and resource efficient driven by intelligent building products, services and technologies. 
Contrary to popular misconception, Finland is not a part of Scandinavia. It shares with Russia a 900-mile long border, the longest contiguous land border in the EU. Slightly less than 40 percent of the EU’s overland trans-shipments into Russia go through Finland underscoring Finland’s role as a regional business hub complemented by its logistical capabilities. Russia is Finland’s largest trading partner and a variety of Finnish companies are successful in Russia, a challenging marketplace. We believe that there are opportunities for certain companies to exploit this existing business by providing  goods via the Finnish corridor. Finland is capitalizing upon its unique position as the center of a rapidly developing marketplace formed by northwestern Russia, the Scandinavian countries, and the Baltic States, creating a marketplace with more than 80 million prospective consumers.

Market Opportunities
There are several opportunities driven by the new relationship with energy, Finland introduced a national long-term climate and energy strategy. Cleantech sector growth has been driven by smaller firms operating in the areas of new materials, smart grids, recycling, and measurement technologies. New cleantech areas to watch now include electric vehicle components and processes for EV manufacturing.  Finland has been involved in the development of low-energy and eco-efficient construction alternatives since the late 1980s. Driven by a continuous challenge to decrease the energy use of the building stock, the Finnish building industry is committing to energy efficient and intelligent building products, services and technologies. Opportunities in the built-environment for energy efficient, high-performance building products sector are not limited to Finland. Europe, with its vast aging buildings is an exceptional opportunity. Embassy Helsinki hosts the League of Green Embassies, a unique vehicle to promote  high-performance building products. The development of renewable energy in Finland is expected to offer opportunities for  companies with innovative renewable energy technologies, processes, and equipment. Finland has expertise in developing computer software products and is looking for partners that can provide financial and other resources. Travel and tourism, Helsinki is connected directly to virtually every major European City while American Airlines begins operations in Finland in May, 2011 enhancing connections between Finland and the U.S. byenabling outbound leisure travel and simplifying business travel.  Finnish healthcare remains interested in state-of-the-art medical equipment. Finland-Russia border trade, nearly 40% of goods from the EU to Russia passes through Finland. Consumers in Russia remain interested in discretionary luxury goods.  Finland’s key regional logistics role will be enhanced by Rail Baltica, one of the priority projects of the European Union Trans-European Transport network. The project will link Finland, the Baltic States and Poland and improve the connection between Central and Eastern Europe and Germany. The plan is for a continuous rail link from Tallinn, Estonia, to Warsaw, Poland via Riga, Latvia and Kaunas, Lithuania. The Helsinki to Tallinn portion will be operated by existing commercial ferries.
-- Iceland
Iceland is a stable democracy with an active consumer economy. The pillars of the Icelandic economy are aluminium smelting, fishing and tourism. Its main material exports are aluminium and ferrosilicon, fish and fish products, and pharmaceuticals. Renewable natural resources are ample and include rich fishing grounds and clean power sources. The services sector includes computer software and biotechnology companies. The majority of imports to Iceland come from the European Economic Area (EEA), 61% in 2013, mainly from the Scandinavian countries, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK. 
With a population of 321,857, the market is small. Icelanders, however, are generally well-educated, with sophisticated tastes and accepting of international consumer goods. Almost all Icelanders speak English, and there is no language barrier for English speakers to doing business in Iceland. Iceland is one of the most advanced countries in the world in the use of information and telecom technology. 

After suffering an economic collapse in 2008, the state took over the three largest commercial banks. Iceland completed an International Monetary Fund program in August 2011 and has seen economic growth restored. As of May 2013, a new coalition government has formed. Unemployment was 4.30% in May 2013. Since late November 2008, the Central Bank of Iceland has implemented temporary rules restricting capital outflow as a measure to support the Icelandic currency, which depreciated 51 percent against the dollar in 2008. As of February 2012, capital controls remain in effect for all but new investments, though it is anticipated that the Central Bank will continue to gradually lift the restrictions. Transactions involving imports and exports of goods and services, travel, interest payments, contractual instalment payments and salaries are still permitted. The Central Bank published its Capital Controls Liberalization Strategy in August 2009, stating that the controls will be lifted in stages. Three steps have been implemented thus far. The outflow of foreign currency for new investments registered with the Central Bank is now allowed, and the Central Bank has begun the process of buying back offshore kronur. Iceland's GDP in 2012 was about $13.89 billion. Real GDP increased by 1.6% in 2012 and is expected to have increased by 1.8% in 2013 when figures are declared. In 2014 GDP growth is projected to be around 2.8%, according to the Statistics Iceland forecast. The forecast predicts 
economic growth from 2013 on. GDP per capita in 2012 was $37,475. The ISK exchange rate was relatively stable in 2012 with capital controls still in full effect. 
Iceland is an island nation located in the North Atlantic Ocean between Greenland and Norway. The first settlers arrived from Norway in 874. Iceland achieved full independence from Denmark in 1944, having been ruled by the Norwegians and then Danes for almost 700 years. Iceland is a member of EFTA (1970) and the EEA (1994). It is also a member of NATO but has no armed forces of its own. The United States, on behalf of NATO, bears primary responsibility for the defence of Iceland under the terms of a 1951 bilateral defence agreement.  In May 2013, the new Icelandic government decided to cease all progress in negotiations to join the EU.

Market Opportunities
  • Energy intensive sectors: The majority of current overseas investment in Iceland is in the aluminium sector. Opposition towards heavy industry has increased, however, both within the government and in the general public. The government seeks to diversify Iceland's economic base by attracting clean industries that will employ its educated population. 
  • Tourism: The industry is among the fastest growing in Iceland, air links are increasing and coordinated national efforts have helped to attract visitors throughout the seasons of the year. 
  • The film industry: Iceland offers special tax incentives to attract film production. Key link: 
  • Consumer products: Iceland is dependent on imported goods. Potential growth areas for exports to Iceland include electric generating equipment, organic foods, fresh produce, wine and beer, computer equipment and software, high-tech fishing equipment, aircraft and furniture. Iceland's first large-scale data center opened in February 2012. Exclusive oil and gas exploration licenses in the Dreki-area Northeast of Iceland were auctioned in April 2012 and exploration licenses where granted in January 2013 to two consortium of Icelandic and Norwegian firms. The Norwegian state oil company Pareto has also exercised its right to hold up to a 25 percent stake in the licenses.
 
-- Norway
Norway is one of the world's richest countries in per capita terms, and the national income per capita is calculated 1.7 times the average of the OECD countries. 
Norway has an important stake in promoting a liberal environment for foreign trade. Its large shipping fleet is one of the most modern among maritime nations. The Norwegian economy features a combination of free market activity and government intervention. The government controls key areas, such as the vital petroleum sector, through large-scale state enterprises. The country is richly endowed with natural resources - petroleum, hydropower, fish, forests, and minerals - and is highly dependent on the petroleum sector. Norway has a per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of USD 54,200 based on purchasing power parities, ranked 8th in the world . After a solid GDP growth in 2004 – 2007, the economy was considered slow and rather contracted in the time period 2008-2009, but returned to positive growth in 2010-2013. Norway’s external financial position is exceptionally strong from a global perspective. Norway is located in the Northern Europe and is a part of the Scandinavian Peninsula. Jan Mayen and the Arctic archipelago of Svalbardare also part of Norwegian territory. The majority of the country shares a border to the east with Sweden; its northernmost region is bordered by Finland to the south and Russia to the east; and Denmark lies south of its southern tip across the Skagerrak Strait. Norway's extensive coastline is facing the North Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea. With a population of 5 million covering 323,802 square kilometers, Norway is one of the most sparsely populated countries in Europe. The population is spread across 1100 mile long, narrow and mountainous landscape, and has a coastline three times its length. Norway is a vibrant, stable democracy and has one of the most financially healthy economies in the world, thanks in part to its status as the world's 7th largest exporter of crude oil and 3rd largest exporter of natural gas. Other major industries, such as shipping, shipbuilding, fishing and fish farming, information technology, pulp and paper products, and light metals processing have prospered as well. Incomes are also more evenly distributed, making every person a consumer. Unemployment rates and interest rates are low. 
The majority of Norwegians are fluent in English and Norwegian business ethics are similar to those of the United States and Western Europe. Norway is not a member of the European Union (EU), but is linked to the EU through the European Economic Area (EEA) agreement. By virtue of the EEA, Norway is practically part of the EU’s single market, except in fisheries and agriculture. Norway is part of the Schengen Agreement, which guarantees free movement of persons and the absence of internal border control between 22 of the 27 EU Member States, as well as Norway, Iceland, Switzerland and Liechtenstein.

Market Opportunities
International companies have excellent opportunities to capture a significant share of new contract awards in Norway's oil and gas, renewable energy, information technologies, and defense sectors.  Other sectors with significant opportunities are telecommunications equipment and services, healthcare technologies, shipping and maritime equipment, tourism and consumer goods.

-- Sweden
The Nordic region of countries (Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Iceland) represents some of the world’s leading free-trading nations, with economies dependent on international trade, and businesses operating largely free of political influences. The Exportto Group offices in these countries work closely together to combine assistance to international companies entering these markets. One very distinct advantage for all Nordic countries for U.S. exporters is the common use of English in commerce. Business agreements are in English and reliable, travel and communication infrastructures are first-rate, and the area is one of the least corrupt, most high-tech, and most competitive regional economies in the world.  Nordic countries are very dependent on international trade and experienced in exports, even with the high cost of labor and living costs. Although Nordic exports to the EU and GDPs are impacted some by financial problems of the southern EU countries, Nordic economies remain strong, albeit with slower growth. For the foreseeable future, the main economic challenges for the Nordics are the development of new job markets, especially for youth and entrepreneurs, with a high-cost welfare system without substantial increase in taxes.  Sustainable development ranks high in importance to the Nordic countries, officials, and citizens. Nordic companies and their governments express great interest in working with international companies  on solutions to lower GHG, identified frequently in the Nordics as “cleantech”. In parallel, Nordic companies also want to invest in overseas regions where sustainable infrastructure is supported strongly by regional governments. Exportto Group organised a delegation from a dozen U.S. cities to visit Stockholm in 2010 when the city was the first EU capital, to work with companies on sustainable infrastructure and to develop commercial partnerships in this sector. 
Nordic markets have knowledgeable consumers who enjoy a average per capita annual income higher than most of the rest of the world. Flexibility in distribution channels and consumer habits help mitigate government and EU controls. Sweden often acts as a Nordic hub for many companies with new-to-market products. Whereas Stockholm can be a frequent stop for international visitors, depending on industry sectors, other major Nordic cities should be considered in travel itineraries. Agents and distributors are commonly used in the initial stage of market entry. First-hand visits are important since Nordic partners want first-hand assurance of company reliability and Nordic businesses want a likelihood of return on their investment of time. 
 
The Nordic region also includes Iceland and also works in close cooperation with less developed Baltic partner posts in Latvia and Estonia. The Nordic-Baltic region represents a large and diversified region of 30 million people. As such, this region can be regarded as an economy the size of Canada’s or Spain’s. 

Market Opportunities
Sweden is considered an ideal test market for new-to-market products, though an expensive one. Swedes are “early adopters”; or in 
some cases, “adapters,” quick to follow or adapt to new trends, however demand for product quality is high, and would be market entrants should not underestimate the time it can take to do business in Sweden compared with say Denmark or Norway where the business culture is fundamentally different.
 
TOSKOVIC Company® - Active advertisments for the job in Scandinavian countries!
For all details contact Us or leave your contact information!
 
TOSKOVIC Company®
e-mail: toskovicrealestate@gmail.com
website: www.toskovicrealestate.com
With all the respect, 
Dragan TOSKOVIC
«TOSKOVIC Company®»
«TD Company®»
«TOSKOVIC Investments Funds» 
«TOSKOVIC Real Estate Business Investments & Consulting Company» 
«TOSKOVIC ESPAÑA» 
«TOSKOVIC EXPORT-IMPORT» 
www.toskovicrealestate.com 
#TOSKOVICCompany®
#TDCompany®
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